Resources
Below is a list of resources we hope will be useful to UA faculty, staff, and graduate students at various stages of digital humanities exploration. This list is not intended to be comprehensive; rather it offers a starting point for further investigation. To recommend new resources, please contact us.
 
Introduction to Digital Humanities
ADHC Workshop Resources
University of Alabama DH Courses
Project Examples
Tools/Standards
Centers/Organizations
Conferences/Training
Conferences Presentations about the ADHC
Grant Opportunities

Introduction to Digital Humanities:


Tools/Standards:


  • NEH Office of Digital Humanities - Although all NEH granting programs will fund work with a digital component, the ODH runs specific funding programs for digital work including: the Digging into Data Challenge for research involving large-scale corpora and databases, Start-Up Grants for new digital projects and Implementation Grants to move test projects into full implementation, and Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities. For more information, see NEH-funded featured projects.
  • ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships - This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. Successful applicants and their projects will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating such works.
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation - Program on Scholarly Communications and Information Technology - The Foundation’s grant-making in scholarly communications has three objectives: (1) to support libraries and archives in their efforts to preserve and provide access to materials of broad cultural and scholarly significance; (2) to assist scholars in the development of specialized resources that promise to open or advance fields of study in the humanities and humanistic social sciences; and (3) to strengthen the publication of humanistic scholarship and its dissemination to the widest possible audience.
  • Council on Library and Information Resources - An independent, non-profit organization that creates strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning. Its goals are to foster new approaches to the management of digital and nondigital information resources so that they will be available in the future, for example, through its Mellon-funded program to Catalog Hidden Special Collections and Archives. CLIR also offers a variety of fellowships.
  • Alfred P. Sloan Foundation - Program on Digital Information Technology - This program has primarily encouraged digitizing material in the public domain; assuring public archiving, preservation and open access of this material; and fostering its availability to people everywhere through such technologies as books on demand.
  • Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) - Visiting Fellowships - Visiting Fellowships at IATH can take a variety of forms. These Fellowships are awarded on an ad hoc basis, and there is no fixed publication deadline. While IATH cannot provide funding to Visiting Fellows, IATH staff will provide guidance to help applicants secure appropriate funding.
  • The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation - Digital Media & Learning Initiative - Through grants to scholars, educators, designers, and practitioners, MacArthur continues to explore and expand on the hypothesis that digital media use is changing how young people think, learn, interact, confront ethical dilemmas, and engage in civic life, and that there are significant implications for the formal and informal institutions that are responsible for educating American youth.

Listing here does not imply any interest or intent on the part of the Alabama Digital Humanities Center or the University Libraries.